february, 2022

202211febAll Day15mayThe Morgan Library & Museum | 02/11/22 - 05/15/22 | Capturing Character | Hans Holbein the Younger | Brooklyn-SouthThe Morgan Library & Museum, 225 Madison Avenue New York 10016 United States

Time

February 11 (Friday) - May 15 (Sunday)

Location

The Morgan Library & Museum

225 Madison Avenue New York 10016 United States

Organizer

The Morgan Library & Museum 225 Madison Avenue New York 10016 United States

Event Details

Art Exhbition
The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue New York 10016 United States

02/11/22-05/15/22

Hans Holbein the Younger (1497/98–1543) was among the most skilled versatile and inventive artists of the early 1500s. He created captivating portraits of courtiers merchants scholars and statesmen in Basel Switzerland and later in England and served as a court painter to Tudor King Henry VIII (1491–1547). Enriched by inscriptions insignia and evocative attributes his portraits comprise eloquent visual statements of personal identity and illuminate the Renaissance culture of erudition self-fashioning luxury and wit.
Holbein: Capturing Character is the first major exhibition dedicated to the artist in the United States. Spanning Holbein’s entire career it starts with his early years in Basel where Holbein was active in the book trade and created iconic portraits of the great humanist scholar Erasmus of Rotterdam (1466–1536). Holbein stayed in England in 1526–1528 and moved there permanently in 1532 quickly becoming the most sought-after artist among the nobles courtiers and foreign merchants of the Hanseatic League. In addition to showcasing Holbein’s renowned drawn and painted likenesses of these sitters the exhibition highlights the artist’s activities as a designer of prints printed books personal devices (emblems accompanied by mottos) and jewels. This varied presentation reveals the artist’s wide-ranging contributions to the practice of personal definition in the Renaissance. Works by Holbein’s famed contemporaries such as Jan Gossaert (ca. 1478–1532) and Quentin Metsys (1466–1530) and a display of intricate period jewelry and book bindings offer further insights into new cultural interests in the representation of individual identity and highlight the visual splendor of the art and culture of the time.

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